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May 5, 2015
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The term ‘blended learning’ first appeared in the late-1990s when web-based learning solutions started to become more widely used and were integrated on one way or another with face-to-face methods. Of course the ‘blending’ concept has been around for much longer than the past few years. Apprenticeship training has ‘blended’ for centuries and the correspondence

January 23, 2015
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My colleague Jane Hart recently shared the diagram below on her blog. It shows the relationship between relative value and relative autonomy as they relate to different approaches for learning in the modern workplace. ‘Learning in the Modern Workplace’ Model Jane’s diagram shows the increasing value that can be released through exploiting learning opportunities beyond

January 20, 2015
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“Progress is impossible without change; and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.” George Bernard Shaw Tom Spiglanin is a senior engineering specialist at the Aerospace Corporation in California and is a leader in the organisation’s technical training department. The people he works with carry out research for the US space programmes –

November 24, 2014
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  “The only person who behaves sensibly is my tailor. He takes new measurements every time he sees me. All the rest go on with their old measurements.” —George Bernard Shaw I’ve always enjoyed George Bernard Shaw’s writing. He was a man who made a great deal of sense to me. I started reading his

November 17, 2014
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(a version of this article was originally written as background for an #OzLearn chat held on Twitter, 11th November 2014) The Power of Embedded Learning A common finding that has emerged from study after study over the past few years is that learning which is embedded in work seems to be more effective than learning

October 7, 2014
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Professor Carol Dweck is a psychologist at Stanford University and the prime force behind mindset theory. Dweck’s research has led her to the conclusion that each individual will place themselves on a continuum according to their implicit belief of where their own ability originates. In simple terms this means that those who tend towards believing